Glenn Pendlay American Weightlifting

In American Weightlifting, Olympic weightlifting coach Glenn Pendlay outlines his methods of teaching weightlifting, and adds tips for better performance in advanced athletes, as well as suggestions for coaches.

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Product Description

by Glenn Pendlay
with James McDermott and Mike Prevost

“I continue to believe that if you succeed at doing one thing really, really well, everything will work out. Your life will have been worthwhile. Your life will have been a success.
~ Glenn Pendlay

For many years, Glenn Pendlay dreamed of writing a book that would have helped him when he was an absolute beginner in the sport of weightlifting. American Weightlifting is that dream realized and is the culmination of his life’s work. The text outlines the training methodology he used to train youth and masters athletes, world team members and everyone in between.

“My life’s work has been and continues to be to elevate American weightlifting up to where it should be.
~ Glenn Pendlay

This book contains detailed explanations of Glenn’s Three-Step Top-Down method for teaching snatch and clean and jerk techniques, along with programming for beginner, intermediate, and advanced weightlifters.

  • Special considerations of programming for sports athletes are also featured in the text.
  • Within these pages, readers will find multi-week programming templates, exercise descriptions, and guidance on competing and nutrition.
  • Wonderful stories, experiences, and photos from Glenn’s many years of coaching are also included.

American Weightlifting has something that will help everyone. Whether you’re a weightlifter at any level or merely enthusiastic about strength training, this book will guide you to success in your journey to technical mastery and gaining strength. Every turn of the page will carry you deeper into Coach Glenn Pendlay’s proven methods of training.

“Courage is the most important quality for a weightlifter.
~ Glenn Pendlay

Topics Covered in American Weightlifting

Glenn Pendlay, Rest in Peace
Foreword, Donny Shankle
Introduction, Trey Goodwin
A Note from James McDermott
Preface

SECTION A—LEARNING THE LIFTS
Chapter 1: Learning the Snatch
The Learning Process
Slow Down and Do It Right
Choosing the Correct Grip Width
The Hook Grip
The Overhead Position
Gaze and the Pressing Era
Correcting the Overhead Position
The Three Step Top-Down Method
The Three Step Top-Down Method: The Snatch
Closing Thoughts

Chapter 2: Learning the Clean
The Front-Rack Position
Front Squats
The Three Step Top-Down Method: The Clean
Closing Thoughts

Chapter 3: Learning the Jerk
Step One—The Press
Step Two—The Push Press
Step Three—The Power Jerk
Step Four—Building the Split Position
Step Five—Special Jerk Exercises
Step Six—The Jerk
Closing Thoughts

SECTION B—TRAINING FOR AMERICAN WEIGHTLIFTERS
Chapter 4: Cultural Differences in Programming
The Soviet Approach
The Bulgarian Approach
An American Approach
Strength and Performance-Enhancing Drugs
Training as a Clean Athlete
Closing Thoughts 

Chapter 5: How to Write a Weightlifting Program
Exposing the Fine Details of Programming
A Look Back at Cal Strength and MDUSA Programming
Strength Exercises
Programming Simplified
What are Training Cycles? 
Percentages in Training
Strength versus Technique
Specificity versus Adaptation
Transitioning to Weightlifting from a General Strength Background
Measuring Progress
Beginning as a Weightlifter
Success in Weightlifting
Closing Thoughts

Chapter 6: Programming for Beginning Weightlifters 
A Beginner’s First Program 
Establishing Baselines 
Pursuing Technical Mastery 
Pursuing Strength 
The Back Squat 
The Deadlift 
Press and Push Press 
Posterior-Chain Strength Exercises 
Programming Strength Exercises 
Programming Posterior-Chain Exercises 
Programming the Competition Lifts 
Important Program Notes 
Changing the Program 
Dealing with Missed Lifts 
Enjoy Being a Beginner 
Instant Gratifi cation 
Sample Beginner Program One 
Your First Meet 
Sample Beginner Program Two 
Closing Thoughts 

Chapter 7: Programming for Intermediate Weightlifters 
Breaking PRs 
Setting Up a Training Cycle for the Intermediate Lifter 
Complexes 
Lifting from Blocks 
Timed Sets 
Assistance Exercises 
Assistance Exercises for the Pull 
Power Snatches and Power Cleans 
Overhead Assistance Exercises 
Assistance Exercises for the Legs 
The Texas Method 
The Pendlay Cycle 
Intermediate Programs 
Four-Day Sample Intermediate Program 
Five-Day Sample Intermediate Program 
Six-Day Sample Intermediate Program Using Timed Sets 
Closing Thoughts 

Chapter 8: Programming for Advanced Weightlifters 
Progressing to Full Time 
Recovery—Going the Extra Mile 
California Strength and MDUSA Schedule 
Individualized Training Cycles 
Advanced Strength Training Methods 
Isometrics 
Snatches and Cleans with a Pause 
Lifts with a Slow Eccentric 
Advanced Training Program Examples 
Donovan Ford’s Program 
Jenny Arthur Vardanian’s Program 
Jared Fleming’s Program 
Kathleen Winters Harris’s Program 
Leo Hernandez’s Program 
Closing Thoughts 

Chapter 9: Westside for Weightlifters 
My History with Westside 
The Conjugate System 
Using Bands and Chains 
The Repetition Method 
Repetition Method Exercises 
Max-Effort Exercises 
Exercise Variations 
Westside for Weightlifters Programming Overview 
Sample Beginner Program 
Sample Intermediate Program 
Sample Advanced Program 
Closing Thoughts 

Chapter 10: Programming for Youth, Junior, and Master Weightlifters
Youth Weightlifters—Generally Ages 4 to 9 
Youth Weightlifters—Generally Ages 10 to 14 
Example Week of Youth Programming 
Youth Weightlifters—Generally Ages 15 to 17 
Junior Weightlifters—Generally Ages 17 to 20 
Masters Weightlifters—Ages 35 to 80 and Above 
Closing Thoughts 

SECTION C—ESSENTIALS FOR AMERICAN WEIGHTLIFTERS 
Chapter 11: Competition Guide 
Competition for the Athlete and Coach 
Preparing for a Competition 
Competition Day 
Warm-Up Progression for the Snatch 
Warm-Up Progression for the Clean and Jerk 
Competition Coaching 
Example Warm-Up Progressions 
Closing Thoughts 

Chapter 12: Making Weight 
Practice Cutting Weight First 
The Four-Step Process 
Timeline to the Weigh-In 
Regaining the Lost Weight 
Timeline for Refueling after the Weigh-In 
Closing Thoughts 

Chapter 13: The Weightlifter’s Kitchen 
Simple Guidelines 
Every Lifter Is Different 
Closing Thoughts 

Chapter 14: The Razor’s Edge 
A Complicated Relationship with Weightlifting 
Do You Have What It Takes? 
The Other Side of Technical Mastery and Gaining Strength 
Closing Thoughts 
And Finally… 

SECTION D—THE PENDLAY SYSTEM FOR ATHLETIC DEVELOPMENT 
Chapter 15: The Clock is Ticking 
Training the Younger Athlete 
The Art and Science of Coaching 
Training Men and Women 
The Right Tool for the Job 
Closing Thoughts 

Chapter 16: The Pendlay Total 
Why Not Use the Olympic Lifting Total? 
Why Not Use the Powerlifting Total? 
Why Not Use the CrossFit Total? 
What about Jumping or Throwing? 
The Pendlay Total 
Plyometrics 
The Testing Protocol 
Closing Thoughts 

Chapter 17: Beginner and Intermediate Athletic Programming 
The Beginner Program for Athletics 
The Intermediate Program for Athletics 
Closing Thoughts 

Chapter 18: Advanced Athletic Programming 
The Advanced Program Exercise List 
Intensity Variation on the Advanced Program 
Programming the Advanced Template 
Rotating Exercises in the Advanced Template 
Conditioning 
Closing Thoughts 

Chapter 19: Implementing Athletic Programs 
Programming for 8 to 12 Years Old 
Programming for Older Than 12 Years Old 
How to Introduce Exercises 
Managing In-Season and Out-of-Season Training 
Overview of the Pendlay System Template 
Closing Thoughts 

Chapter 20: Epilogue: American Weightlifting and the Pendlay Legacy 
On Learning the Lifts 
On Programming 
On Being a Weightlifter 
On Coaching 
On Communication 
Paying It Forward 
Closing Thoughts 

APPENDICES
Appendix 1: American Weightlifters 
Caleb Ward 
James Moser 
Travis Cooper 
James Tatum 
Donny Shankle 
Jon North 
Spencer Moorman 
Kevin Cornell 
Justin “Moppy” Brimhall 
Closing Thoughts 

Appendix 2: The Pendlay Articles 
Additional Thoughts on Weightlifting 
Additional Thoughts on Squat Training 
Additional Thoughts on Deadlift Training 
Guideposts 
The Training Log 

About the Co-Authors
James McDermott 
Mike Prevost 

Acknowledgments 
Comments from James 
Athlete Models 
Photographer Credits 
Index 

“Maxing out is a legitimate part of the training process. Actually making a new snatch or clean and jerk PR is the best possible training for making a new snatch or clean and jerk PR.
~ Glenn Pendlay

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Let Coach Pendlay guide you toward your Olympic weightlifting goals through this new book, American Weightlifting.

As with all of the print books sold on OTP, this book includes the ebook files at no additional cost.

Glenn Pendlay

Glenn Pendlay

Glenn Pendlay was a Level 5 USA Weightlifting coach, a lecturer, a researcher, and an author. As an athlete, he was active in powerlifting, throwing, and weightlifting, then went on to become one of the most influential and sought-after coaches in America. He held the highest of coaching accreditations and produced world team members, over 100 national champions, more than 20 international medalists, and athletes who collectively broke 10 American records in a single year.

Glenn’s work in the field of endocrinology greatly impacted weight training in the United States. He studied and published papers on how different levels of stress affect the endocrine system and the body’s ability to adapt to stress. This work contributed to developing better training systems for American weightlifters and athletes from other sports, raising the level of performance for US athletes on the national and international stages.

Glenn died on September 5, 2019, after a short battle with cancer. He’s perhaps best remembered for his willingness to share knowledge and for his unrelenting love for the sport of weightlifting.

“Weakness is a crime.
~ Glenn Pendlay

James McDermott

James McDermott is a USA Weightlifting Level 2 coach who regularly competes in weightlifting meets. As a coach, he’s led seminars, and has taken over 40 individual athletes to their first competitions. Through the barbell club, he’s produced a Masters National Champion, two Masters Pan American Champions, and a Masters World Champion. James has also authored multiple books and is the host of The Barbell Strikes Back! podcast. Visit jamesamcdermott.com for information on his other works.

Mike Prevost

Mike Prevost earned his BA in natural science and behavioral science from the University of Louisiana, Lafayette, his MBA from the Naval Postgraduate School, and his Ph.D. in exercise physiology and kinesiology from Louisiana State University. During his Navy career, he was the staff exercise physiologist for the US Naval Academy, charged with directing the human performance laboratory, serving as a consultant to the athletic department, and managing the remedial fitness programs.

“Success in weightlifting is not just measured by the size of the mark we left on the sport. It’s also measured by the size of the mark the sport left on us.”
~ Glenn Pendlay

Chapter List

Glenn Pendlay, Rest in Peace 11
Foreword, Donny Shankle 15
Introduction, Trey Goodwin 17
A Note from James McDermott 19
Preface 21

SECTION A—LEARNING THE LIFTS 23
Chapter 1: Learning the Snatch 25
The Learning Process 25
Slow Down and Do It Right 26
Choosing the Correct Grip Width 27
The Hook Grip 29
The Overhead Position 30
Gaze and the Pressing Era 30
Correcting the Overhead Position 31
The Three Step Top-Down Method 35
The Three Step Top-Down Method: The Snatch 36
Closing Thoughts 41

Chapter 2: Learning the Clean 43
The Front-Rack Position 43
Front Squats 45
The Three Step Top-Down Method: The Clean 47
Closing Thoughts 50

Chapter 3: Learning the Jerk 53
Step One—The Press 53
Step Two—The Push Press 54
Step Three—The Power Jerk 55
Step Four—Building the Split Position 57
Step Five—Special Jerk Exercises 58
Step Six—The Jerk 60
Closing Thoughts 61

SECTION B—TRAINING FOR AMERICAN WEIGHTLIFTERS 63
Chapter 4: Cultural Differences in Programming 67
The Soviet Approach 68
The Bulgarian Approach 69
An American Approach 70
Strength and Performance-Enhancing Drugs 71
Training as a Clean Athlete 71
Closing Thoughts 72

Chapter 5: How to Write a Weightlifting Program 75
Exposing the Fine Details of Programming 75
A Look Back at Cal Strength and MDUSA Programming 76
Strength Exercises 76
Programming Simplified 76
What are Training Cycles? 78
Percentages in Training 79

Strength versus Technique 80
Specificity versus Adaptation 81
Transitioning to Weightlifting from a General Strength Background 82
Measuring Progress 83
Beginning as a Weightlifter 84
Success in Weightlifting 84
Closing Thoughts 84

Chapter 6: Programming for Beginning Weightlifters 87
A Beginner’s First Program 88
Establishing Baselines 89
Pursuing Technical Mastery 89
Pursuing Strength 91
The Back Squat 93
The Deadlift 94
Press and Push Press 96
Posterior-Chain Strength Exercises 96
Programming Strength Exercises 99
Programming Posterior-Chain Exercises 101
Programming the Competition Lifts 101
Important Program Notes 104
Changing the Program 105
Dealing with Missed Lifts 106
Enjoy Being a Beginner 106
Instant Gratifi cation 106
Sample Beginner Program One 107
Your First Meet 109
Sample Beginner Program Two 109
Closing Thoughts 111

Chapter 7: Programming for Intermediate Weightlifters 113
Breaking PRs 113
Setting Up a Training Cycle for the Intermediate Lifter 114
Complexes 114
Lifting from Blocks 117
Timed Sets 119
Assistance Exercises 122
Assistance Exercises for the Pull 122
Power Snatches and Power Cleans 127
Overhead Assistance Exercises 130
Assistance Exercises for the Legs 130
The Texas Method 131
The Pendlay Cycle 132
Intermediate Programs 134
Four-Day Sample Intermediate Program 134
Five-Day Sample Intermediate Program 137
Six-Day Sample Intermediate Program Using Timed Sets 140
Closing Thoughts 142

Chapter 8: Programming for Advanced Weightlifters 143
Progressing to Full Time 143
Recovery—Going the Extra Mile 144
California Strength and MDUSA Schedule 144
Individualized Training Cycles 145
Advanced Strength Training Methods 146
Isometrics 146
Snatches and Cleans with a Pause 151
Lifts with a Slow Eccentric 152
Advanced Training Program Examples 152
Donovan Ford’s Program 154
Jenny Arthur Vardanian’s Program 156
Jared Fleming’s Program 158
Kathleen Winters Harris’s Program 160
Leo Hernandez’s Program 162
Closing Thoughts 164

Chapter 9: Westside for Weightlifters 165
My History with Westside 165
The Conjugate System 167
Using Bands and Chains 167
The Repetition Method 168
Repetition Method Exercises 169
Max-Effort Exercises 178
Exercise Variations 186
Westside for Weightlifters Programming Overview 190
Sample Beginner Program 190
Sample Intermediate Program 200
Sample Advanced Program 209
Closing Thoughts 226

Chapter 10: Programming for Youth, Junior, and Master Weightlifters 227
Youth Weightlifters—Generally Ages 4 to 9 227
Youth Weightlifters—Generally Ages 10 to 14 230
Example Week of Youth Programming 232
Youth Weightlifters—Generally Ages 15 to 17 234
Junior Weightlifters—Generally Ages 17 to 20 235
Masters Weightlifters—Ages 35 to 80 and Above 237
Closing Thoughts 240

SECTION C—ESSENTIALS FOR AMERICAN WEIGHTLIFTERS 243
Chapter 11: Competition Guide 245
Competition for the Athlete and Coach 245
Preparing for a Competition 247
Competition Day 249
Warm-Up Progression for the Snatch 250
Warm-Up Progression for the Clean and Jerk 252
Competition Coaching 253
Example Warm-Up Progressions 255
Closing Thoughts 259

Chapter 12: Making Weight 261
Practice Cutting Weight First 261
The Four-Step Process 252
Timeline to the Weigh-In 264
Regaining the Lost Weight 264
Timeline for Refueling after the Weigh-In 265
Closing Thoughts 266

Chapter 13: The Weightlifter’s Kitchen 267
Simple Guidelines 267
Every Lifter Is Different 268
Closing Thoughts 269

Chapter 14: The Razor’s Edge 271
A Complicated Relationship with Weightlifting 272
Do You Have What It Takes? 272
The Other Side of Technical Mastery and Gaining Strength 273
Closing Thoughts 273
And Finally… 274

SECTION D—THE PENDLAY SYSTEM FOR ATHLETIC DEVELOPMENT 275
Chapter 15: The Clock is Ticking 277
Training the Younger Athlete 278
The Art and Science of Coaching 279
Training Men and Women 279
The Right Tool for the Job 279
Closing Thoughts 280

Chapter 16: The Pendlay Total 281
Why Not Use the Olympic Lifting Total? 282
Why Not Use the Powerlifting Total? 282
Why Not Use the CrossFit Total? 283
What about Jumping or Throwing? 283
The Pendlay Total 284
Plyometrics 287
The Testing Protocol 288
Closing Thoughts 289

Chapter 17: Beginner and Intermediate Athletic Programming 291
The Beginner Program for Athletics 293
The Intermediate Program for Athletics 294
Closing Thoughts 295

Chapter 18: Advanced Athletic Programming 297
The Advanced Program Exercise List 297
Intensity Variation on the Advanced Program 299
Programming the Advanced Template 299
Rotating Exercises in the Advanced Template 299
Conditioning 301
Closing Thoughts 303

Chapter 19: Implementing Athletic Programs 305
Programming for 8 to 12 Years Old 305
Programming for Older Than 12 Years Old 306
How to Introduce Exercises 306
Managing In-Season and Out-of-Season Training 306
Overview of the Pendlay System Template 307
Closing Thoughts 308

Chapter 20: Epilogue: American Weightlifting and the Pendlay Legacy 309
On Learning the Lifts 310
On Programming 311
On Being a Weightlifter 314
On Coaching 315
On Communication 316
Paying It Forward 318
Closing Thoughts 320

APPENDICES
Appendix 1: American Weightlifters 325
Caleb Ward 326
James Moser 327
Travis Cooper 328
James Tatum 329
Donny Shankle 330
Jon North 332
Spencer Moorman 333
Kevin Cornell 334
Justin “Moppy” Brimhall 335
Closing Thoughts 337

Appendix 2: The Pendlay Articles 338
Additional Thoughts on Weightlifting 341
Additional Thoughts on Squat Training 345
Additional Thoughts on Deadlift Training 347
Guideposts 351
The Training Log 353

About the Co-Authors
James McDermott 357
Mike Prevost 358

Acknowledgments 359
Comments from James 361
Athlete Models 363
Photographer Credits 365
Index 371

Excerpts

 

 

Who Benefits?

Olympic weightlifting coaches and trainees who would like to learn Coach Pendlay’s coaching methods

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$9.99$39.95